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Live With No Guts?

Live With No Guts?

To many of us, doggies are the friendliest pet. However, quite some people fear them. It comes naturally that we may all have our own fears. It could be snakes, spiders or cockroaches. However, when the fear to a specific object or scene excessively overwhelms the danger it might cause and affect our daily lives, we have to find solution to overcome it.


Such as in Sam’s case, as a postman he was chased by a dog half a year ago at work and feared dog ever since then. In the theory of Cognitive-Behavioral-Therapy, the thought that "since dogs would surely bite me, I have to stay away from any of them” was rooted in his mind after the incident. As a result, when he sees dog, he would feel rapid heartbeat, trembling and breathing difficulty and behaviorally running away. Such fear has seriously influenced his job efficiency.


"Exposure” Exercise Helps

Now Sam is using "exposure” exercise to help himself out of the strait.

  1. Firstly, he records down the situation when he encounters with dogs, and realizes the obsessive thought of "since dogs would surely bite me, I have to stay away from any of them” and its level of painfulness.

  2. Secondly, he categorizes things related to dogs with their level of painfulness and anxiety.

  3. Finally, he tries to gradually carry out "exposure” daily, that is to watch doggy cartoon to begin with, and then to touch doggy dolls, to stay within ten meters with a dog, and finally lay hand on a real dog.

After repetitive practice, Sam realizes that the thought of "dog would bite if I do not run away” is out of his imagination only. His level of fear to dogs lowers day by day. When he sees dog at work, he would not escape again and this greatly improves his efficiency in work.


To know more about how to face specific fear, please watch the following video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6CKcBDPp2Y

 

If you are suffering from the similar problem as Sam, please contact the Jockey Club eGPS Psychological Support Project (eGPS) for more information and support.

Jockey Club eGPS Psychological Support Project
Tel:3188 2550
Email: egps@nlpra.org.hk
Website: https://www.egps.hk/



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